Category Archives: Relationships

26 Stagger Your Stance

Without thinking much about it go ahead and stand the way that feels normal to you. Now take a look at your feet. Where have you placed them? More or less parallel to each other? This is the most common way I see people place their feet when they are standing.

If you have been noticing that you stand with your hip joints pushed forward and you tend to stand with your feet parallel changing up the way your organize your feet in standing may be useful.

Standing with feet parallel provides you with stability right to left but not so much front to back.

Standing in a staggered stance, one foot slightly in front of the other and angled out a bit, provides you not only with stability right to left but also front to back.

To understand this more fully find a friend. First stand with feet parallel and ask your friend to place her hands on the front of your shoulders and try to push you over. Then stand in a staggered stance and ask your friend to try the same thing again. Switch roles so you have a chance to experience this from both roles. You will probably find that it is more difficult to push the other person over when they are in a staggered stance.

If you watch people engaged in martial arts practices you will notice that they very often use a staggered stance and one reason is that it is that much more stable.

Standing with feet parallel and hips pushed forward

Standing with feet parallel and hips pushed forward

Standing more balanced with feet slightly staggered

Standing more balanced with feet slightly staggered

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can still push your hip joints forward in a staggered stance but if it is not your normal way of positioning your feet in standing it might help you to be a bit more aware of where your weight is. You can think of positioning your weight right between the front and back foot right down through your apple core.

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25 Let Your Spine Be Like an Apple Core

If you find you tend to stand with your hip joints pushed forward and your upper back thrown backward you are in good company. As you observe others you will see how ubiquitous this detrimental habit is. Realize that seeing others tends to subconsciously reinforce this is the way to stand. But now that you know otherwise you can be more mindful and attentive to yourself and make some other choices.

Another reason this habit of standing is so detrimental is that with your upper back thrown backward your weight is situated over the back or nerve part of the spine, not the front or support part of the spine.

The skeleton is standing with the weight transferred down through the front part of the spine

Fig 1: Balanced standing-weight transferred down through the front part of the spine

Look at the side view of the skeleton at the right. Your spine starts at your tailbone located a little higher than your sitting bones and between them. It curves its way all the way up to the level of your ears. Pay special attention to how thick the spine is at the lower end (right above the pelvis) at the level of the lower back and abdomen.

If you run your hand up and down your friend’s back you are feeling the back part of her spine. It is important to realize that this is only part of the spine.

Your spine has two main functions—support (discs) and communication (spinal cord and nerves). The discs are located toward the front. The spinal cord and nerves run along the back.

In the illustration the skeleton is standing balanced with the weight transferred down through the front part of the spine (this is the vertical line)

If you are standing with hip joints pushed forward and upper back thrown backward your weight is situated over the back or nerve part of the spine. Ouch!

Standing with feet parallel and hips pushed forward

Here I am standing with my weight thrown backward over the nerve part of my spine. Ouch!

You want your weight centered over the support or front part of the spine. For this reason when I imagine my spine I imagine the support part (the front part). Because the front part of my spine is actually more or less in the middle of my body (look at the vertical line in the illustration again) I like to imagine it like the core of an apple (albeit a slightly curvy one!). I let my weight transfer down through my apple core instead of thinking of the spine like a rod along my back.

apple core

If you remember in post 8 I introduced the term body map—we all have in our mind maps of our bodies and how they work. These body maps include size, shape and function.

What is important to realize is that you will typically move (and sit and stand) in accordance with how you think you are structured, even if your thinking is inaccurate. If your body map is faulty, movement and consequently posture, suffers.

So to help correct your body map of your spine think of it more like the core of an apple, not like a rod along your back.

How you think does affect how you move, sit and stand.

Picture credits: Fig 1: How to Learn the Alexander Technique by Barbara and William Conable

24 Knee Locker

No, a Knee Locker is not a locker at the gym to keep you knees in. It is someone who habitually locks their knees when standing.

What does standing with locked knees actually mean? More importantly, why should you care?

I differentiate between standing with knees (1) locked (2) balanced or (3) bent.

Three ways or organizing your knee joint. In each illustration the front of the leg is toward the right. On the left the knee is locked. In the middle the knee is straight. Notice how the to leg bones balance on top of each other. On the right the knee joint is bent.

Fig 1: Three ways or organizing your knee joint in standing. In each illustration the front of the leg is toward the right. On the left the knee is locked. In the middle the knee is balanced. Notice how the to leg bones balance on top of each other. On the right the knee is bent.

Standing with bent knees over time is tiring because you have to work to keep the bent joint stable.

Standing with locked knees is also a waste of energy as you habitually contract muscles in the quadriceps (front of your upper legs) to push your knees backward as far as they will go.

More importantly to our recent discussion of standing is that standing with locked knees also often results in you pushing your hip joints forward in response.

Mannequins in a New York City shop window

Fig 2: Mannequins in a New York City shop window. They are all standing with the knees locked and consequently the hip joints pushed forward.

Notice that there is not a big visual difference between the locked knees and the balanced knees. If you find that you are locking your knees, don’t bend them but just stop locking your knees. You will probably notice a subtle change but not a huge change. It may just be a sensation of not tightening in your legs so much.

Standing on balanced knees allows the weight to transfer down through the upper leg bones, through the knee joint and down through the lower legs bones, the ankles the arch of the foot and into the floor. You can think of locking the knees as blocking that easy flow down through the legs.

So if you have noticed over the past few weeks that you do tend to park your hip joints forward another way to work on it is to notice if you lock your knees when you are standing and intervene by practicing not locking your knees.

Here is a great blog post by a physical therapist that talks about this very subject. It gives you a simple exercise to practice becoming more aware of the knee locking habit.

Picture credits: Fig 1: What Every Musician Needs to Know About the Body by Barbara Conable; Fig 2: Lindsay Newitter (www.nyposturepolice.com);

23 A New Use for Your Countertop

How did your observations go? Have a chance to check out any mannequins?

Below is a picture of mannequins in a New York City shop window taken by my colleague, Lindsay Newitter (check out her fun blog)

Mannequins in a New York City shop window

Fig 1: Mannequins in a New York City shop window

So you see even the mannequins are standing with their hip joints pushed forward.

Why is standing with your hip joints pushed forward so detrimental?

If you consider the pelvis to be the foundation of the upper part of your body you want it firmly under you so it can support your torso, shoulders, neck and head. When the hip joints are pushed forward your pelvis is not positioned firmly under you.

This is the same principle that we talked about with sitting in post 9.

If you had a house and the foundation shifted it wouldn’t be safe to live in, would it? You would probably be evacuated and not be allowed back in until it was fixed.

When you push your hip joints forward it causes other things to readjust as you attempt to stay balanced.

Look at the picture of me below standing with my hip joints pushed forward. How does that affect my upper back ? Can you see that my upper back is thrown backward behind my pelvis?

Standing with feet parallel and hips pushed forward

An unfortunately typical way to see people standing today: hip joints forward and upper back thrown backward

Often if someone is then carrying something in front of them this unhealthy relationship is often further exaggerated.

 

Further exaggeration of the standing posture above

Fig 2: Further exaggeration of the standing posture above

If you draw a line vertically from her upper back to the ground there would be nothing underneath to support it.

The problem is that the way you habitually stand will tend to feel vertical even if it is not . So, instead of relying on whether you “feel” like you are standing vertically, it is useful to have an external reference point—like a countertop.

When you find that you are in front of a counter (bathroom counter, kitchen counter, store counter…) simply begin by noticing how you are orienting your hip joints in relationship to the counter.

If you push your hip joints toward the counter the first step is to realize this is actually something you are doing. You are pushing your hip joints forward. If you are doing something you can choose to stop doing it, even just a little bit. Let there be some space between the counter in front of you and your hip joints.

It is not so much that you have to do something new. Just do less of what you are already doing.

The key is that you have to start with observation. If you don’t notice you are doing something that is unhelpful, harmful or plain unnecessary you can’t choose to stop doing it.

With observation comes choice.

Picture credits: Fig 1: Lindsay Newitter (www.nyposturepolice.com); Fig 2: Back Trouble by Deborah Caplan.

22 Where Are You Parking Your Hip Joints?

To follow this post I suggest that you get good and acquainted with your hip joints—where your legs connect to your pelvis. If you need help re-read post 8  before reading further.

Alexander teachers are very interested in the head-spine relationship. I would go so far as to say that the head—spine relationship is the Primary relationship in your body. It is the first relationship you want to pay some attention to but not the only relationship. Another very important relationship is that of the pelvis to the legs.

What you are habitually doing with your pelvis will affect your head—spine relationship and vice versa.

When you stand what do you do with your pelvis? Where do you park your hip joints? Do you even know?

Do this little experiment with me. You will need a chair with a relatively high back that you can place your hands on. Like this one:

P1010568I have taken the following pictures outside (I couldn’t resist the beautiful day!) but it will be best to do this experiment inside with a full length mirror at your side. Stand behind the back of the chair and review where your hip joints are

P1010580Now place your hands on the top rail of the chair like this

P1010571Tip the chair backwards (toward you) and at the same time push your hip joints forwards

P1010579Place the chair on the floor and now tip the chair forwards (away from you) and at the same time allow your hip joints to move backwards. This will cause you to fold or bend.

P1010576Try this a few times going back and forth, coordinating the pull of the chair backwards with pushing your hip joints forwards and the push of the chair forwards with allowing your hip joints to move backwards.

As you move through this range of motion is there a place that feels familiar? If so, stop in that place. Look in the mirror. This is probably how you tend to stand.

If the familiar place is with your hip joints pushed forwards you are in good company. There are lots of you out there. It seems to be a more and more common way for people to stand. But definitely not something to imitate.

For now I invite you to watch your family, friends, co-workers and just plain strangers and see where they tend to park their hip joints when they are standing. If you happen to be in a mall in the next two weeks, take a look at the mannequins as well.

9 Your Bottom Belongs Behind You

Let’s stay down at the bottom end of the spine and get more acquainted with the pelvis.

When you are standing you stand on your two feet. I think we can agree on that. When you are sitting upright on a chair you sit with the majority of the weight on your two sitting bones. Sitting bones is a term often used for the two rocker shaped protrusions at the bottom of the pelvis. Ischial tuberosities is the correct anatomical term but that is a mouthful. Besides that it sounds like some sort of disease. Sitting bones is easier to remember and sounds more benign.

illustration of pelvis with rocker shaped sitting bones

Fig 1: Your sitting bones are your internal rocking chair.

If you sit down on a relatively firm chair and put your hands under you, between you and the chair you should be able to feel these two rocker shaped bones. Rock and roll around on them. Rock forward and back. Make a circle going to the right. Make a circle going to the left. Get fancy and make a figure eight! I like to think of my sitting bones as my internal rocking chair.

Your pelvis serves as the foundation for your upper half. Therefore you want to make sure it is squarely under you when you are sitting. In order to have your pelvis and sitting bones squarely under you, you must get your bottom behind you. That’s important so I am going to repeat it.

In order for your pelvis and your sitting bones to be squarely under you, you must get your bottom behind you.

Don’t sit on your bottom. Sit on your sitting bones.

Young girl using laptop on beach

Fig 2: This girl is sitting on her bottom

young boy seated on a pumpkin

Fig 3: This little boy is sitting with his bottom behind him

If you sit on your sitting bones you will have much easier access to your hip joints which is where you need to bend from if you are going to move forward toward something like the computer keyboard or some project you are doing on the table in front of you, or to reach for something.

If you imagine that you had a tail, sitting with your bottom tucked under you would be like sitting on your tail. Sitting with your bottom behind you would be like placing your tail out behind you.

So go forth, explore, experiment and get to know your sitting bones. You will, by the way, find it much easier to get your sitting bones squarely under you if you are sitting on a flat seat as opposed to one that slopes backward. Why would that be? Stay tuned…

Picture Credits: Fig 1: Aron Czerveny. Available as a free download  (Thank you Tim Soar!); Fig 2: Image courtesy of photostock at FreeDigitalPhotos.net; Fig 3: Image courtesy of Clare Bloomfield at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

8 Your Waist is Like a Unicorn

I have spent quite a bit of time explaining what your head is (skull and lower jaw), where your skull balances on top of your spine (way up high between your ears) and the function of your Nodding Joint (to look up and down). This all in order to help you evaluate, and if need be, correct your body map of the head-spine.

Body map? Huh?

We all have in our mind maps of our bodies and how they work. These body maps include size, shape and function. Many things have gone into the creation of your body map over the years. What is important to realize is that you will typically move in accordance with how you think you are structured, even if your thinking is inaccurate. If your body map is faulty, movement suffers.

Body mapping is the conscious correcting and refining of one’s body map by assimilating accurate information provided by kinesthetic experiences, mirrors, models, books, pictures, and teachers. Alexander teachers frequently use body mapping to help their students.

Don’t worry. In my experience you don’t need to understand every minute detail of your anatomy to manage your posture and move with ease and efficiency. But there are some key relationships and joints that I find are fundamental to map correctly. The Nodding Joint is one of them. The Hip Joints are another.

We’ve been up at the head for a while. Let’s move down to the other end of your spine. What is at the other end of your spine? Your pelvis. The head and pelvis are like two bookends on either end of your beautifully curved and somewhat flexible spine. In between is your rib cage.

The Hip Joints are where your legs join your torso. And this my dear friend I find is the second most mismapped joint in the body along with that Nodding Joint. So, let’s find it!

To locate your Hip Joints stand up, march in place and slide your fingers into the crease the legs make with the torso in front. Your fingers should be pointing in toward the hip joints. This is a ball and socket joint and allows for a great deal of free movement. If you have low back pain it is extremely important to locate and learn to use your hip joints freely for bending, as opposed to your waist.

Skeleton as viewed from teh front showing the locatin of the waist vs the hip joints

Fig 1: Notice the location of the waist vs the hip joints and the considerable distance between the two.

The waist, like the unicorn is a myth. The waist is not an anatomical structure. It is where we put our belts. However, we often think of the waist as a real entity with hinge like qualities. The spine is flexible in this area but is not designed to be used as a hinge. Faulty thinking often leads to faulty use—repeated use of the waist as a hinge joint, as opposed to the hip joints lower down, is responsible for a lot of lower back problems.

Illustration of bending at the (fictitious)  waist joint.

Frg 2: Bending using my (fictitious) waist joint. Ouch!

Illustration of bending using teh hip joints

Fig 3: Bending using my hip joints.

Experiment with bending lower down from your hip joints as opposed to your waist.

Picture credits: Fig 1: Back Trouble by Deborah Caplan